Animal of the week!
This week’s animal is one that belongs to phylum Cnidaria: the snakelocks anemone. A lot of us know that part in Finding Nemo where Nemo tries to say “anemone” and screws it up at least 4 times, but not a lot of people see these creatures as animals. There are over 106 species of sea anemone. This particular species is found in the eastern Atlantic Ocean and in the Mediterranean Sea. Anemones are made up of a column (the “body”) and tentacles. The column of the snakelocks anemone is 7 cm wide and 8 cm tall. A range of 70 to 384 tentacles are attached to the top of the column. This anemone can look a number of ways. The column will either be brown or grayish with white radial lines, and the tentacles will either be gray-brown or green, and the green tentacles will have purple tips. As with any cnidarian, it’s best to stay away when you see them. One touch from the tentacles can cause a nasty sting.

Animal of the week!

This week’s animal is one that belongs to phylum Cnidaria: the snakelocks anemone. A lot of us know that part in Finding Nemo where Nemo tries to say “anemone” and screws it up at least 4 times, but not a lot of people see these creatures as animals. There are over 106 species of sea anemone. This particular species is found in the eastern Atlantic Ocean and in the Mediterranean Sea. Anemones are made up of a column (the “body”) and tentacles. The column of the snakelocks anemone is 7 cm wide and 8 cm tall. A range of 70 to 384 tentacles are attached to the top of the column. This anemone can look a number of ways. The column will either be brown or grayish with white radial lines, and the tentacles will either be gray-brown or green, and the green tentacles will have purple tips. As with any cnidarian, it’s best to stay away when you see them. One touch from the tentacles can cause a nasty sting.